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 Post subject: Incorporating New and Old Floors
PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 12:11 pm 
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I am in the process of researching how to incorporate a new hardwood floor into an exisiting hardwood floor because we are interested in adding an addition. Is it doable? What is the best process? Is it better or easier if the floor is glued, nailed, or the type of subfloor we have down....What are the downfalls or pitfalls, for that matter, if any?

Thanks for your help.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 8:35 pm 
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Location: Murphys, Calif.
That's kind of a tricky question. You need to able to determine what type of floor you have now. Solid, or engineered. Are you going to be able to remove the existing row, to lace in the new where the two come together? How much of the existing house is hardwood, and is it worth saving? I think your best bet, if your not qualified to make these determinations yourself, is to have an experienced installer, (not salesperson), look at your job, and give you his assement. It will cost you a little money, but it will be money well spent.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 2:05 am 
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(not salesperson)

Agreed.

How old is the floor? What type of floor is it? What is the substrate?

Anything can be done. It is a simple matter of time and material.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:33 pm 
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Thanks for your responses.

It is 3/4" plywood and red oak flooring. It is a kitchen addition and less than 5 years old.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 7:41 pm 
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Five years old? It would be much easier than a fifty year old one that may have old growth hardwood--hard to match/shrinkage/expansion. You just need someone that knows how to do a "tie in" properly or what some call "lacing in" I agree completely with Steve--no salespeople. Somebody with real installation experience would offer the best advice.

You would have to stay with 3/4" solid hardwood for best results and install the new with the same method the old was. It would be a good idea to keep the floor joists in the same direction too.


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 Post subject: Not Salesperson
PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 8:16 pm 
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Make sure that you have the installer write out what they'd like to see happen, and what they intend to do. Then make sure they are the ones who do the work down the line.
Unfortunately most installers have their own way of doing things, and another may not have chosen to do it the same way. Some others never do it the same way twice. At least you'll have it in writing as an explanation.


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 Post subject: Re: Not Salesperson
PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 8:47 pm 
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Andrew L wrote:
Make sure that you have the installer write out what they'd like to see happen, and what they intend to do. Then make sure they are the ones who do the work down the line.
Unfortunately most installers have their own way of doing things, and another may not have chosen to do it the same way. Some others never do it the same way twice. At least you'll have it in writing as an explanation.



Ain't that the truth!

Good suggestion!

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 Post subject: One of my greatest challenges as a salesperson
PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 2004 12:17 pm 
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The different ways of "skinning the cat" are some of the hardest things for me to deal with. This is why in situations like these I may not be of much help. One advantage I might have however is that I may be able to enlighten as to how different installers may approach things. Schade13 may want to hear the different approachs and their advantages/disadvantages.


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 Post subject: Re: One of my greatest challenges as a salesperson
PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2004 5:49 pm 
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Andrew L wrote:
The different ways of "skinning the cat" are some of the hardest things for me to deal with. This is why in situations like these I may not be of much help. One advantage I might have however is that I may be able to enlighten as to how different installers may approach things. Schade13 may want to hear the different approachs and their advantages/disadvantages.


yes....I would. Any different approaches would be appreciated. What is the best approach to choosing an installer for this type of project? Should I contact an association or is there a listing? Do they need a certain amount of experience? How difficult is the process I am refering to in installation terms?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2004 2:14 am 
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Weaving in a floor is a piece of cake for me. I've done it more times than I can count However, Not everyone has the same experience level. Try to find someone who is licensed, been installing and repairing wood floors for at least ten years (master craftsman) Ask them about their experience in adding on to existing floors, ask for references, especially from general building contractors, ask to see a job where they added on to an existing floor (weave in). That's about all you can do. Then go with your gut!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2004 4:57 am 
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How wide is the lace in area?

Any jackass can lace in a 6foot doorway and call it a piece of cake.

A wider expanse requires true expertise. Acclimation goes a long way in making a long lace-in work out.

I have done quite a few lace-ins where walls were taken out to expand a room. I was often at the mercy of the guy that installed the existing. Much head scratching involved.


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 Post subject: Lacing in
PostPosted: Sat Dec 25, 2004 12:09 am 
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Schade13,
There isn't going to be an easy way for you to get through this. You need to get out and research your area.
What you really need to get is the very best contractor for your addition. Once you find them, they should point you in the way of the installer they work best with. They may or maynot be the best around, but working well with the contractor will be better in the long run.

If you are going to put in the addition yourself, you'll need to find the best installer for you to work with. It won't matter how good the installer is, unless they can get accross to you what they need, they may as well be rookies.

By the way, the best process will be whatever the installer decides with the contractor or yourself.

Good luck.


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